Thank you internet distraction!

I was watching a clip of Otis Redding at Monterey, which made me think of  Steve Cropper, which got me watching some interview videos.

This one stood out:

Aside from his seeming to be a really, really nice guy, I was struck by the history as he represents it, and it reminded me of something to which I’ve long paid attention:

We look back on the greats, and we think there was something divine in their path, some meant to be, some destiny. Yet, when they speak, you hear that they were just like you and I, they met failure, success and luck, and somehow through the decisions they made in each moment, and their willingness to just go with the flow, the seemingly-destined path emerged with each step.

At about 11 minutes, Cropper talks about how he first met Otis Redding. Ask yourself, honestly, would you have given the band’s driver the time of day when he asked if he could sing for you?

Then, towards the end, he describes a kid who approached the band and asked to play sax, even though he’d only been playing for 3 or 4 weeks. Again, ask yourself, would you have said yes or no? That kid’s mother owned a recording studio that would go on to become Stax records.

In each case, Cropper’s answer was: “OK, let’s try it.”

How often could you choose that answer instead of “No” or “it won’t work” or “I’m scared of that”?

I guess that’s my challenge to you

[and myself, of course]

to each moment with a lived attitude of  “OK, let’s try it” .

Love-peace-trust

Vince Sig 131x89